I'm on page 16 of the novelisation of Evil of the Daleks by John Peel, and it's making me violently angry.

Peel is a continuity obsessed fanboy, and that's fine, but there's a time and place for it. I don't normally mind authors expanding the worlds in which the original stories were set, but this is really pissing me off. The story doesn't need all this retconning, it only needs minimal background, but in the prologue alone Peel manages to tie in with Frontier in Space, Daleks' Master Plan, and Genesis of the Daleks.

The only bit that fits is later when the Doctor is thinking about his past self, who is busy on the other side of London. Given it relates directly to Ben and Polly leaving, it's a fair addition to make.

Then he manages to get the details of the Chameleon's plan from The Faceless Ones arse about, talking about their plan to invade Earth, when their actual plan was to abduct 50,000 humans and leave.

I dunno, maybe I'm just being too harsh. Or maybe I'm right to be angry that I'm being inundated by dodgy continuity by an author who manages, on the second page, to misspell the name of the Dalek home-world as Skarao.
dalekboy: (oven)
( Feb. 21st, 2010 05:31 pm)
I've mentioned doing the Wii Fit thing on here a couple of times, so now it's time to expand on that a little. Background on my fitness... )

So why the Wii Fit? )

Trying the Wii Fit... bit long... )

Results... )
dalekboy: (Default)
( Dec. 24th, 2009 11:24 pm)


Arañas Infernales dates from 1968 and stars Mexican luchadore wrestler Blue Demon as the hero who finds himself pitted against the Hellish Spiders of the title.Read more... )
I liked it, the core idea worked, but somehow it still seemed like a step backwards to me.

6/10 as a Prisoner remake
6/10 as a TV show

Major spoilers below cut )
Tags:
A definite improvement, darker and more interesting, drawing on concepts used in the original series while adding one that would not have been out of place in that show.

5/10 as a Prisoner remake
6/10 as a TV show

Major spoilers below the cut... )
Tags:
Bland, and lacking the intensity and inventiveness that made the first episode of the original series such an amazing brainfuck.

3/10 as a Prisoner remake
5/10 as a TV show

Thoughts below the cut will probably contain massive spoilers for the first episode )
dalekboy: (Dalek gets bothered)
( Oct. 15th, 2009 10:57 am)
The last couple of weeks I've been wiped and emotional, my cold has come back (it never fully went away), and today I've majorly barked the back of my right foot on the wire door, hurt the index finger of my left hand mending the gate, and hurt the thumb on my right hand fixing a tap.

On the bright side I spent chunks of yesterday watching Ghost Rider, which while Nicolas Cage was a bit crap in it, I still found to be an enjoyable film. And Christopher Young did the film's music, and I almost always enjoy his work.

And I finished The Kolchak Papers which was a good read despite the huge amount of spelling errors.
While I don't see the point of most remakes, there are some that I think are better than the originals, like Ocean's Eleven and Little Shop of Horrors, or different but more or less equal to the originals, like The Thing and Cat People.

The local video library has brought back $2 Tuesday, so I thought it was time to check out the remake of The Day the Earth Stood Still.

It's a pointless remake that will be deservedly forgotten within a couple of years, along with the remakes of The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds. Very minor spoilers )

This film is exactly why I don't go see major films at the cinema unless I get glowing reports from people. It wasn't worth my time or my money. In fact I originally thought that $2 would be a fair price to see this, but now having seen it, it wasn't even that good.

Don't bother. Hire or buy the original. Yes it's got its flaws, but it was written by people who knew how to write, and made by people who knew how to make films.
dalekboy: (Motivation Hazard)
( Sep. 5th, 2009 11:25 am)
We've yet to watch the special 13th episode that's on the DVD, but Sharon and I have now seen to the end of the first televised season.

While it had its moments, overall we've been left unimpressed and unengaged. No major spoilers, but chunks of criticism that may give away elements... )
dalekboy: (Default)
( Aug. 2nd, 2009 12:33 pm)
Had chills and been substandard the last two days. Blah!

But I needed to watch through a few things before the The Best TV Shows That Never Were panel I'm on at C5, and being sick suddenly means I'm better able to make the time to do so. Just rewatched the pilot of the 2000 series The Invisible Man (also known as I-Man in some countries), and pretty much instantly remembered why I enjoyed the show. Read more... )
Just watched the old 1978 film, Return from Witch Mountain. In it there are a gang of wannabe tough guys (all played by kids) called the Earthquakes. Their gang names are Rocky, Muscles, Crusher, and Dazzler.

I think Dazzler is kind of missing the point. He's way older and a good head taller than the other kids, so you'd think he'd get the whole 'tough' nickname thing. What makes it especially funny is the way he lights up as introduces himself to Kim Richards. "...and I'm Dazzler!"

For all the film's problems, there are actually some fairly full-on moments during the major chase scene, and Christopher Lee plays his part dead straight, which is especially nasty when he's trying to arrange for a child to be crushed to death.

5/10
Just watched the old 1978 film, Return from Witch Mountain. In it there are a gang of wannabe tough guys (all played by kids) called the Earthquakes. Their gang names are Rocky, Muscles, Crusher, and Dazzler.

I think Dazzler is kind of missing the point. He's way older and a good head taller than the other kids, so you'd think he'd get the whole 'tough' nickname thing. What makes it especially funny is the way he lights up as introduces himself to Kim Richards. "...and I'm Dazzler!"

For all the film's problems, there are actually some fairly full-on moments during the major chase scene, and Christopher Lee plays his part dead straight, which is especially nasty when he's trying to arrange for a child to be crushed to death.

5/10
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dalekboy: (Default)
( May. 11th, 2009 12:21 am)
A bit of background - The last Star Trek movie I enjoyed was First Contact (or as most people know it, the Borg one) which is also the only Star Trek movie out on DVD that I still wish to buy.

I refuse to buy the 9th and 10th films. I'll watch them again if someone loans them to me, and who knows, I may re-evaluate my position, but for the moment I feel that Paramount got my money at the cinema, and they ain't gettin' another cent outta me for those lacklustre pieces of crap. I felt dissatisfied while viewing them, and by their respective finales was feeling quite cheated at what we were being given. Overlong, uninspired episodes that weren't even internally consistent and hoped to disguise what they were by wearing tarty clothes and talking dirty.

So, the new film. No real spoilers, but cut for those who are worried... )

Well worth a look.

7/10
Tags:
dalekboy: (Default)
( May. 11th, 2009 12:21 am)
A bit of background - The last Star Trek movie I enjoyed was First Contact (or as most people know it, the Borg one) which is also the only Star Trek movie out on DVD that I still wish to buy.

I refuse to buy the 9th and 10th films. I'll watch them again if someone loans them to me, and who knows, I may re-evaluate my position, but for the moment I feel that Paramount got my money at the cinema, and they ain't gettin' another cent outta me for those lacklustre pieces of crap. I felt dissatisfied while viewing them, and by their respective finales was feeling quite cheated at what we were being given. Overlong, uninspired episodes that weren't even internally consistent and hoped to disguise what they were by wearing tarty clothes and talking dirty.

So, the new film. No real spoilers, but cut for those who are worried... )

Well worth a look.

7/10
Tags:
I have now seen it. I thought it was a good film, with an interesting concept/conceit - until the last ten minutes when it breaks the Monty Python rule.

There's a rule of comedy that I heard many years ago, attributed to the boys from Monty Python - If you have four men standing in dustbins talking, you don't need to explain it. The audience will accept it. But if someone then walks on in a business suit, you need an some sort of explanation. - It's a rule I think works equally well for any bit of writing.

Rant on Knowing that will contain massive spoilers for the end of the movie - Oh, and there's a fair bit of swearing - you have been warned... )
dalekboy: (Exterminate Butterflies)
( Mar. 25th, 2009 11:44 pm)
Watched Tim Burton's Sweeney Todd tonight, based on the Stephen Sondheim musical. This is the sort of movie that is made just for me. Tim Burton, Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter (who I'm pretty sure wants to have my babies), Timothy Spall, and Alan Rickman, working together on a dark musical.

As a film it was ok, but as a musical it didn't work. Which means essentially that as a film it didn't work. Now I'm left to wonder whether the musical was always bad, or whether Burton's adaptation of it is rubbish.

For me, if I don't come away humming a single song, or even remembering them, it's a failure. And if Sharon, who is a song-stuck-in-the-head magnet, isn't caught by any of them, then that's badness times two!

I just watched Deep Roy's songs from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to get the taste out of my mouth.
dalekboy: (Default)
( Mar. 13th, 2009 05:33 pm)
In the last week or so, between getting ready for the rent inspection, looking after Lex, and not much else, I have been thoroughly enjoying two different movie related shows. Actually, not enjoying - mainlining. Inhaling.

Both are by non-professionals

The first is Terry Frost's Paleo Cinema, a fairly regular podcast on movies pre-dating 1980. Terry's range of tastes and knowledge is fairly eclectic and encyclopedic, though as he is the first to admit, he's no expert. Terry forewent a formal study of cinema, and instead simply grew up watching lots of films.

His shows are usually well put together and presented, and it tends to feel like you're sitting around chatting with him, rather than being talked at. I don't always agree with his views and criticisms, but there hasn't been a single show I haven't enjoyed.

I checked out a couple of random podcasts, but have now gone back to the start and am running through the shows in order. Highly recommend it.

The other is The Bazura Project, a movie show that screens on Channel 31. Shannon Marinko and Lee Zachariah present a half-hour program of news, reviews, interviews, entertainment and general silliness. Every show opens with a short parody of a well-known film (there's only been one I haven't picked so far).

My attention was first drawn to the Bazura Project by this report on Media Watch about their efforts to get nominated for a Logie.

All three seasons are watchable on their website, and on youtube. I started from the first episode and I'm now nearing the end of season two.

What I enjoy about both shows are that they are simply people who love movies talking to you about them. It's rare I come away from either without wanting to check out something new, or rewatch something old.

Check'em out!
* I made banana and walnut muffins today, and they were yummy. I gave half to Bill and Diane from the Post Office, because they are lovely people and I didn't manage a Chrissy prezzie for them last year.

* Our estate agent has put back our rent inspection a month at my request. Basically told her we were in the middle of sorting/rearranging, and the house would be a mess.

Cut for extreme length, and because there's nothing overly exciting... )
I'm still kind of wrecked, so today after episode 2 of Time and the Rani, I watched Superman and the Mole Men (1951) to help get the taste out of my mouth.

It was George Reeves' first go at playing Superman, and he did it well. Superman is a deadly serious and no-nonsense kind of guy in this. Not afraid to put people in their place by taking their guns, or giving the undeserving townsfolk an acidic comment.

Spoilers under cut )As films go, it's a bit slow but mercifully short at just under 60 minutes. The production values are low, and the Mole Men are cheap. But I rather like Superman's characterisation, and the take on the base idea.

Quite reasonable for a piece of fifties sci-fi.
Given I talked about Nightmare on Elm Streets 5 and 6, I though I may as well talk briefly about the seventh film, given I've just finished going through the box set.

New Nightmare is not only the best Elm St. movie since the original, it's probably the best movie of the series. Wes Craven's had ten years to further hone his writing and directing skills, and it shows. The core premise is interesting and a clever twist on the old idea. The best summation is that of all the films, this was the only one that still evoked feelings of tension from me, even though I know the film well.

Freddy Krueger is back to doing what he does best - being an all pervading background presence that only appears now and again. This is highlighted by an appearance of Freddy as he became, a pop-culture icon, as opposed to a demonic force. It makes the appearances of demon Freddy more interesting, scarier, because we haven't had time to get used to his new incarnation.

Some clever ideas, solid acting, and a great script - I could easily sit and watch it again. Which I'll do at some point soon so I can listen to Craven's commentary track.
.

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